• Impact and Outputs from the Higher Power Project

    CSARS: Chester Studies of Addiction, Recovery and Spirituality Group The Higher Power Project Background The Chester Study of Addiction, Recovery & Spirituality (CSARS) Group is based at the University of Chester and aims to: To undertake qualitative research amongst people in recovery, with a focus on spirituality, broadly defined. To develop projects in the community […]

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  • Durham Cathedral Lecture

    Wendy presented some of the findings of the Higher Power Project at the Faces and Voices of Recovery Spirituality Conference on September 11th 2015.

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  • Higher Power Project Conference 20th – 21st February 2013 – Report

    What does religion have to say about addiction? Faith-Based Solutions to Addiction Conference The Faith-Based Solutions to Addiction Conference at the University of Chester on February 20th 2013 attempted to answer this question by offering a forum for a range of Faith-Based Organisations (FBOs) dedicated to helping addicts turn their lives around to explain their […]

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  • Can Spirituality Help People with Substance Use Disorders?

    In the days following comedian Russell Brand’s announced plans for Comic Relief benefit to help highlight the issue of drug and alcohol dependence in the UK, academics from the University of Chester are preparing for a two-day event focused on the issues of addiction.

    On February 20th and 21st, the institution is hosting a two-day event where well-known speakers from the fields of addiction studies, religious studies and theology, as well as treatment centre professionals and counsellors, will discuss the connection between addiction and spirituality.

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  • Higher Power Project Newsletter Volume 1 Issue 1

    The Higher Power Project is a qualitative study of the diversity of the language of Higher Power used by people in twelve-step recovery from addiction. The twelve step approach to recovery identifies the problem of addiction as rooted in the powerlessness of the individual over the substance or behaviour which is causing them or others harm. Given acceptance of this, an alternative power must be sought.

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